Top 3 Most Common Summer Tire Maintenance Mistakes

Summer Tire Maintenance Mistakes

Our tires go through a lot in the summer…they pass through heat waves across the Trans Canada highway, take us through some rad back roads, get us to our favorite camping spot, and wait patiently for us on the hot asphalt in the parking lot of our work. We count on our tires to get us everywhere in the summer…and most of the time we completely forget about them. This summer is different! Read the following most common mistakes drivers make in the summer, so you can avoid them!

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1. DRIVING ON TIRES WITH EXTREMELY LOW TREAD DEPTH

 According the Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Act, passenger vehicle and light truck tires have to be replaced when tread depth reaches 2/32 of an inch or 1.5 millimetres on summer tires. That’s actually the minimum before your tread depth is considered legally bald; however, even at this tread depth, safety is being compromised.

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2. DRIVING ON TIRES THAT ARE UNDERINFLATED OR OVERINFLATED

Most drivers are on top of their tire pressure in the winter, when cold air causes tires to deflate. In the summer, hotter temperatures can have the opposite effect!

Temperatures aside, our vehicles do a lot more traveling and with heavier loads in the summer, so it’s important to maintain their recommended air pressure, and that tire maintenance task often gets neglected in the summer months.

To look up the recommended air pressure for your vehicle - open the driver’s side door and look at the door jam OR the owner’s manual.

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3. DRIVING ON WINTER TIRES IN THE SUMMER

A lot of people are still driving around in July with their winter tires on. Some driver are trying to stretch their budget, they think it’s safer to have winters on in the summer, or they may never get around to it.

Whatever your reason is…it is a dangerous move to drive around with summer tires on. Unless they are all-weather tires. Here’s why we do not recommend driving in the summer with winter tires on. Winter tires are made with a rubber compound that is designed to stay soft and grip in colder temperatures ONLY. All-season and summer tires have a harder compound that gives their best grip at temperatures above 7 C, and on warm, dry and mild wet conditions.